saveournhs-wm.org.uk

Campaign news update - April 23 2013

Our biggest ever regional response to an e-campaign (left) has resulted in a wave of lobbying letters and emails to crossbench Peers in support of Lord Hunt’s bid to halt the privatisation of the NHS.

The ‘Adopt A Lord’ email/letter generator has been busy. Many people have sent the information on to others.

Letters and emails are pouring into the Peers’ in-boxes from this region. But we cannot assume that the job is done.

. . . BY EMAIL

Click HERE now

. . . BY PHONE

CALL our 24-hr line  0121 314 0607 and leave a message.

LET’S TALK. . .

We can work together to ensure that NHS decisions are made on health grounds and not for profit margins.

Add your voice to the debate today . . .

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38 Degrees WM

A way for individual voices to be heard

. . . AND VOTE!

ADD your name to the national 38 Degrees petition here to signal your opposition to the Coalition’s NHS giveaway

Tomorrow (April 24) the Lords meet to consider the potentially ‘fatal motion’ that could stop the dismantling of the NHS in its tracks, we’re asking you to spare five minutes to write again, this time to a different cross-bench Peer.

In a nutshell, the Lords are being asked to vote against the regulations this time because they were not given the facts about the NHS-crippling enforced and unfair competition rules when they first voted on the issue.

Cross-bench Peers are famously awkward and cantankerous. it could be that enough of them are sufficiently incensed by the Govt’s underhand attempts to sneak the hidden regulations past for them to spark a (dignified and well-mannered) rebellion. Please, write again today.

How a Lord’s ‘prayer’ could 
save the day  (and the NHS)